Posts Tagged ‘process of writing’

  • FOUND POEM

    Date: 2021.01.13 | Category: Assignments, LHP/MHP, Poetry, Septuagenarian | Response: 0

    FOUND POEM

    Attributed to Septuagenarian: love is what happens when I die (March 2021)

     

    One doesn’t have to imagine good and evil amidst all this terror

    sadness, the bones and the blood surrender

    we can make a difference we are all somebody

    we are not on the backs on the backs on the backs

    of sorrow

     

    that preceded

     

    head separated from body

    body separated from country

    family separated

     

    love guarantees memory        madness

    guns in white rooms the ghost

    of a man an unholy ghost trying to rewrite the story

     

    what if what if what if asking the questions is [not] enough; sometimes

     

    I feel like a boxer punching    the world

    is heavy that’s when the silence is broken

    not with words but with images   children

     

    didn’t know what to make of the bickering

    children got lost in the silences babies suffering;

    the father the mother the siblings gone

    a newspaper headline

     

    to the wicked and the wise there is a difference

    between opinion and truth, a space where dying

    to love where freedom is clearly not where in the world we are

     

    divisive and our lives are at risk

    tolerate a difficult word; racism, white men with assault rifles; death

     

    is temporary

     

    history implodes on a regular irregular heartbeat the charade is over this year

     

    love

    like a sorcerer reads palms this is love choking on air,

    ready to survive pedestals

    collapse amidst a pandemic

     

    hallelujah!

     

    as I sip my morning coffee it is grief it is death it is love;

    hate travels the ♥ broken is what saves us.

     

    © Sherry Quan Lee January 12, 2021

     

    ASSIGNMENT: I’ve been thinking about the recent insurrection at the capitol, the fast and flowing media coverage, the attempts to oust the 45th, etc.  My thought was, as a poet, I should write a found poem based on various print and even video media; but, I thought it would be complicated because of copyright, what is fair use, and how to attribute my sources (unless there is no thought of publishing it).  Instead, I turned to my own writing using only text from my forthcoming book.  Try this as an assignment, use words and phrases from what you have previously written and “find” a poem. I started with a goal in mind, to discover what I might have, perhaps unknowingly, said beyond the personal, have I entered the world?  Having a theme in mind isn’t necessary, it is enough to just randomly choose words and phrases you are drawn to as you reread what you have written over a particular span of time.

    NOTE: The poem published here is a first draft.

  • How Dare We! Write FREE DESK COPIES

    Date: 2017.05.21 | Category: How Dare We! Write a multicultural creative writing discourse, The Art of Writing | Response: 0

    WRITING INSTRUCTORS PLEASE NOTE:

     
    “If you are teaching a high school or undergrad or graduate Creative Writing course in 2017-2018, we are accepting requests for desk copies of “How Dare We! Write: a multicultural discourse.”

    Please email info@ModernHistoryPress.com from your faculty email address to request a copy and include the following:

     
    1. The course number, name and institution where you teach
    2. Your complete shipping address and whether you would like printed or eBook edition

     
    We can only guarantee that the first 50 instructors who reply will get a desk copy. You are encouraged to share
    this information with interested colleagues.

    (Review: https://thelinebreak.wordpress.com/…/on-how-dare-we-write-…/)

  • Excerpt from How Dare We! Write

    Date: 2017.03.23 | Category: Writers Who Dare | Response: 0

    “The tinikling offers a visual explanation of how bilingual writing
    works. Like the agile dancing feet of a tinikling dancer, a bilingual
    writer’s mind is connected to her feet at all times, transferring and
    translating the beat of clapping bamboos from a hearing experience to
    a whole body experience. Living in a predominantly English-speaking
    culture means you cannot stop to think or even attempt to explain
    your actions and your meanings, or you will lose track of the dominant
    beat and find yourself caught in the thorns of misunderstanding. I can’t
    help but relate this to the spate of recent attacks on black bodies we
    have witnessed. There is never time to explain your black skin or your
    brown skin to someone intent on eradicating your black or brown
    body because he or she feels threatened by the mere sight of you. You
    have to keep dancing between the clapping bamboos of race
    perception. Those who tried, hands up or not, have ended in tragedy.
    Is this a far-fetched metaphor? If it is to you, you’ve never had to
    dance/write between bamboos.”–Marlina Gonzalez, How Dare We! Write

  • Excerpt from How Dare We! Write

    Date: 2017.03.23 | Category: How Dare We! Write a multicultural creative writing discourse | Response: 0

    “I would add that many programs do not even offer courses dealing
    with race and writing as an elective. I didn’t know such a thing existed.
    Over the duration of my program, my writing became less race conscious
    instead of more. Sure everything thing I do and say leaves the
    mark of blackness behind. However, instead of drawing a circle around
    the mark, expanding it, aiming the camera directly at it, I placed
    translucent covering over it, not completely hiding race, but placing it
    in the background. Without knowing it, I was learning to write like a
    white woman because I must have believed that they knew what they
    were doing. They were award-winning authors. They were where I
    wanted to be. They were my teachers.”–Sherrie Fernandez-Williams, How Dare We! Write

Artist Statement

Sherry Quan Lee approaches writing as a community resource and as culturally based art of an ordinary everyday practical aesthetic. Lee is a Community Instructor at Metropolitan State University (Intro to Creative Writing, Advanced Creative Writing), and has taught at Intermedia Arts, and the Loft Literary Center. She is the author of A Little Mixed Up, Guild Press, 1982 (second printing), Chinese Blackbird, a memoir in verse, published 2002 by the Asian American Renaissance, republished 2008 by Loving Healing Press, and How to Write a Suicide Note: serial essays that saved a woman’s life, Loving Healing Press, 2008.

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SHERRY QUAN LEE

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