Posts Tagged ‘multicultural’

  • How Dare We! Write: a multicultural creative writing discourse (Modern History Press, May 2017).

    Date: 2017.03.23 | Category: How Dare We! Write a multicultural creative writing discourse, Writers Who Dare | Response: 0

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    How Dare We! Write: a multicultural creative writing discourse (Modern History Press, May 2017). Sherry Quan Lee, editor.

    Poet and editor Sherry Quan Lee challenged 24 multicultural writers to respond to the question, “How dare we write?” The resulting personal narratives and examinations of craft reveal how and why we write, uncovering the challenges—linked to culture, race, class, religion, gender and/or sexuality; and the intersections among these factors—presented to us by the very structures and institutions of U.S. society, which create the always pressurized and often toxic environment in which we write. Mainstream teachers and publishers may not recognize or understand these narratives, their forms and voices, as valid or worthy, but they must work to do so in order to provide multicultural writers with constructive feedback and a path toward publication. This book will centrally be of use to writers who experience the same kinds of challenges, but also to those teachers and publishers opening up their work to diverse communities of writers and readers.

    Each narrative in How Dare We! Write (ISBN 978-1-61599-330-7) includes a creative writing exercise, which may be used as a personal or group writing prompt, or the framework for college, high school, or community writing workshops.

    Cherise A. Pollard, PhD, Professor of English at West Chester University extols: “How Dare We! Write offers a much needed corrective to creative writing pedagogy. The collection asks us to consider the following questions: what does it mean for an indigenous, or black, or Latinx, or Asian, or Middle Eastern, or LGBTQIA+ (or a combination of these identities) American to become a writer? …What does it mean to work through resistance from supposed mentors, to face rejection from publishers and classmates, to stand against traditions that silence you, to stand in your truth about your identity so that you can claim, fearlessly, your history, your trauma, your joy…”

    Contributors include: Gabriella Anais Deal-Marquez, Marcie Rendon, Marlina Gonzalez, Michael Kleber-Diggs, Lori Young-Williams, Jessica Lopez Lyman, Luis M Lopez, Sagirah Shahid, Saymoukda Duangphouxay Vongsay, Tou SaiKo Lee, Anya Achtenberg, Ginny Allery, Wesley Brown, Kandace Creel Falcón, Olive Lefferson, Christine Stark, Isela Gomez, Bell Brown, Brenda, William S. Yellow Robe, Jr, Ching-In Chen, Sweta Vikram, Hei Kyong Kim, Sherrie Fernandez-Williams, and Taiyon Coleman.

    Sherry Quan Lee is a writer, teacher, literary editor, and mentor. Love Imagined: a mixed race memoir was a 2015 Minnesota Book Award Finalist. She has also authored two books of poetry: Chinese Blackbird, and How to Write a Suicide Note: serial essays that saved a woman’s life.

    For more information, contact:

    Victor Volkman, Publisher

    Modern History Press,

    5145 Pontiac Trail
    Ann Arbor, MI 48105-9627
    Toll Free USA/Canada: (888)761-6268

    www.ModernHistoryPress.com

    info@ModernHistoryPress.com

  • NORTH MINNEAPOLIS from LOVE IMAGINED

    Date: 2013.09.23 | Category: LOVE IMAGINED, The Art of Writing | Response: 0

    Truly, I have been working on my book, and if I could just keep editing instead of stopping and starting overwhelmed by my own darn self at times, then maybe LOVE IMAGINED would be off to the publisher.  Actually, I can do this, it’s almost finished (I keep telling myself).  The problem now is the ending, currently I have three endings!  And formatting, I’m not sure where to add the historical facts, but I’m workin’ on it.

    It’s been so long since I’ve posted a blog entry, I didn’t recognize my own Web site.  I think a little gremlin has been lookin’ after it, re-organizing it, or else I’m just having too many senior moments, another reason to get this book done, who thought I would be old enough to be so forgetful, and memoir is about remembering and I don’t want to forget the stories of who I am because it’s been 65 years trying to make sense of myself!

    Here’s Chapter Two of LOVE IMAGINED.

    2.  NORTH MINNEAPOLIS

    Recently a friend challenged me about my use of the term South Scandinavian Minneapolis, where I grew up.  As a writer, I know it’s important to be specific.  Specifically, I grew up in a house on a hill on 26th Avenue and 39th Street, two blocks from Roosevelt High School.  My friend, Carolyn was right.  Carolyn lived in South Minneapolis too.  She went to Central High School.  My cousin went to Central High School. Carolyn had a crush on my cousin.  They lived in Minneapolis, but they lived with black folk, unlike me who lived East of whatever line divided us.  My aunt, my cousin’s mom, lived near 38th and Portland, this sometime after she and her family lived in the row houses in North Minneapolis, the ones just off of Olsen Highway, or was it Plymouth.  Another Aunt lived near 4th Avenue and Lake Street in South Minneapolis.  I didn’t know much about geography when I was little, but I did know my mother’s family could only visit at night, when it was dark, and our neighbors couldn’t see them.

    Aunt Grace lived in North Minneapolis.  She moved from a Duplex on Emerson Avenue North, though I don’t know how I know this, and maybe I’m wrong, but I remember going there once as a very small child. This is where Grandma also lived.  It must have been sometime after Grandma died of rat poisoning or Draino when the cancer was more painful than she could bear.  Aunt Grace and her family moved further west, trespassing into the Jewish neighborhood, 16th and Vincent. Avenue North.  Streets and Avenues don’t change, but people coming and going do.  I remember we visited Aunt Grace, my mom, my sisters and I, taking a bus down Broadway, stopping to shop at the junk stores, then walking to the most beautiful home I had ever seen.  At least I remember doing this once.  But when I turned eighteen, I let the secret out of the closet, though I don’t know how I knew my mother was passing for white and we, the children were supposed to be white or at least be Chinese like my father, but he disappeared when I was five.  I did my best and continue to integrate myself into a family I had been segregated from for way too many years.

    My Aunt Grace, my Aunt Marion, and my mother have now passed away.  I love them all dearly, they are angels on my shoulder.  Wherever I live, and I’ve lived in more than 50 different homes, and five different states, but they are always with me.  Recently I bought a home in Oakdale, Minnesota.  The 2000 census said Oakdale is mostly white, but it’s not anymore.  My women friends have visited me, Asian, Mexican, Black, straight, gay.  My cousin has visited, in fact I have a cousin that lives just next door in Woodbury, as well as my sister.  No one has to visit at night.  I welcome the next census when I can add one more person of color to a neighborhood that was once mostly white.  My friend Lori laughs because she remembers being the only black student, well she and her siblings, at Tartan High School, just down the street from where I now live.   She says where I live used to be farmland.

    NOTE:  By 1880, there were 362 Blacks in Minneapolis, and by 1930 the Black population numbered 4,176. The Black community tended to concentrate in two areas–on the near north side of the city and on the south side near Fourth Avenue South and 38th Street.

    … By one estimate, there were as many as 10 active Ku Klux Klan chapters in Minneapolis in 1923. Their attacks were broadly focused on nonwhites, socialists, Jews, Catholics, and the new Communist threat.

    …Minneapolis later elected a Jewish mayor, Arthur Naftalin, in 1961.

    http://www.hclib.org/pub/search/specialcollections/mplshistory/?id=26

     

     

Artist Statement

Sherry Quan Lee approaches writing as a community resource and as culturally based art of an ordinary everyday practical aesthetic. Lee is a Community Instructor at Metropolitan State University (Intro to Creative Writing, Advanced Creative Writing), and has taught at Intermedia Arts, and the Loft Literary Center. She is the author of A Little Mixed Up, Guild Press, 1982 (second printing), Chinese Blackbird, a memoir in verse, published 2002 by the Asian American Renaissance, republished 2008 by Loving Healing Press, and How to Write a Suicide Note: serial essays that saved a woman’s life, Loving Healing Press, 2008.

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SEPTUAGENARIAN

Septuagenarian by Sherry Quan Lee

GOODREADS GIVEAWAY

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How Dare We! Write by Sherry Quan Lee

How Dare We! Write

by Sherry Quan Lee

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HOW DARE WE! WRITE

LOVE IMAGINED

Love Imagined book by Sherry Quan Lee

CHINESE BLACKBIRD

Chinese Blackbird Book by Sherry Quan Lee

HOW TO WRITE A SUICIDE NOTE

How to Write a Suicide Note by Sherry Quan Lee

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