Posts Tagged ‘Jessica Lopez Lyman’

  • Writers Who Dare! Write, photo by Charissa Uemura

    Date: 2017.10.09 | Category: How Dare We! Write a multicultural creative writing discourse, Writers Who Dare | Response: 0

  • Jessica Lopez Lyman

    Date: 2017.05.07 | Category: Writers Who Dare | Response: 0

     

  • Excerpt from How Dare We! Write

    Date: 2017.03.23 | Category: Writers Who Dare | Response: 0

    “You start to find your body again. Notice your feet on the ground.
    Walk barefoot in the grass and scrunch your toes into the cold soil.
    You eat full meals sitting down without your computer on or a chapter
    in front of you to edit. You watch movies at the two-dollar theater,
    attend Lynx games, play soccer, and work out with friends. When
    people talk you actually listen to them. Your mind does not keep the
    running list of the next project, the email that wasn’t sent, the citation
    that needs to be added to the footnote on page forty-three. You start to
    recover. Even your breath is different. Lungs expand more. Instead of
    short shallow breaths, air now moves from your core. It’s not about
    anxiety, you realize. It’s the weight of centuries, of doubt, of other
    people’s stories. If you do the work, write, most importantly listen to
    your research participants, to your family, your breath comes more
    easily.”–Jessica Lopez Lyman, How Dare We! Write

  • How Dare We! Write: a multicultural creative writing discourse (Modern History Press, May 2017).

    Date: 2017.03.23 | Category: How Dare We! Write a multicultural creative writing discourse, Writers Who Dare | Response: 0

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    How Dare We! Write: a multicultural creative writing discourse (Modern History Press, May 2017). Sherry Quan Lee, editor.

    Poet and editor Sherry Quan Lee challenged 24 multicultural writers to respond to the question, “How dare we write?” The resulting personal narratives and examinations of craft reveal how and why we write, uncovering the challenges—linked to culture, race, class, religion, gender and/or sexuality; and the intersections among these factors—presented to us by the very structures and institutions of U.S. society, which create the always pressurized and often toxic environment in which we write. Mainstream teachers and publishers may not recognize or understand these narratives, their forms and voices, as valid or worthy, but they must work to do so in order to provide multicultural writers with constructive feedback and a path toward publication. This book will centrally be of use to writers who experience the same kinds of challenges, but also to those teachers and publishers opening up their work to diverse communities of writers and readers.

    Each narrative in How Dare We! Write (ISBN 978-1-61599-330-7) includes a creative writing exercise, which may be used as a personal or group writing prompt, or the framework for college, high school, or community writing workshops.

    Cherise A. Pollard, PhD, Professor of English at West Chester University extols: “How Dare We! Write offers a much needed corrective to creative writing pedagogy. The collection asks us to consider the following questions: what does it mean for an indigenous, or black, or Latinx, or Asian, or Middle Eastern, or LGBTQIA+ (or a combination of these identities) American to become a writer? …What does it mean to work through resistance from supposed mentors, to face rejection from publishers and classmates, to stand against traditions that silence you, to stand in your truth about your identity so that you can claim, fearlessly, your history, your trauma, your joy…”

    Contributors include: Gabriella Anais Deal-Marquez, Marcie Rendon, Marlina Gonzalez, Michael Kleber-Diggs, Lori Young-Williams, Jessica Lopez Lyman, Luis M Lopez, Sagirah Shahid, Saymoukda Duangphouxay Vongsay, Tou SaiKo Lee, Anya Achtenberg, Ginny Allery, Wesley Brown, Kandace Creel Falcón, Olive Lefferson, Christine Stark, Isela Gomez, Bell Brown, Brenda, William S. Yellow Robe, Jr, Ching-In Chen, Sweta Vikram, Hei Kyong Kim, Sherrie Fernandez-Williams, and Taiyon Coleman.

    Sherry Quan Lee is a writer, teacher, literary editor, and mentor. Love Imagined: a mixed race memoir was a 2015 Minnesota Book Award Finalist. She has also authored two books of poetry: Chinese Blackbird, and How to Write a Suicide Note: serial essays that saved a woman’s life.

    For more information, contact:

    Victor Volkman, Publisher

    Modern History Press,

    5145 Pontiac Trail
    Ann Arbor, MI 48105-9627
    Toll Free USA/Canada: (888)761-6268

    www.ModernHistoryPress.com

    info@ModernHistoryPress.com

Artist Statement

Sherry Quan Lee approaches writing as a community resource and as culturally based art of an ordinary everyday practical aesthetic. Lee is a Community Instructor at Metropolitan State University (Intro to Creative Writing, Advanced Creative Writing), and has taught at Intermedia Arts, and the Loft Literary Center. She is the author of A Little Mixed Up, Guild Press, 1982 (second printing), Chinese Blackbird, a memoir in verse, published 2002 by the Asian American Renaissance, republished 2008 by Loving Healing Press, and How to Write a Suicide Note: serial essays that saved a woman’s life, Loving Healing Press, 2008.

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SHERRY QUAN LEE

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HOW DARE WE! WRITE

LOVE IMAGINED

CHINESE BLACKBIRD

HOW TO WRITE A SUICIDE NOTE

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